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What Happens When You Pour Water on a Grease Fire?

Pouring water on a grease fire is unsafe.Knowing how to handle fires in the home is important for every homeowner or tenant. But with so many fires still causing damage, injury and death every year, it’s apparent that more education and better tools are needed to save lives and property.

Learning how to manage different types of fires, such as knowing what to do in case of a grease fire, could make the difference between life and death. Pouring water on a grease fire may seem like the right thing to do or could even be a natural reaction to seeing flames, but it actually makes the situation much more dangerous.

Residential fires have declined slightly over the past decade, due in part to more advanced detection systems. But that hasn’t eliminated the threat; kitchen fires are responsible for an average of 172,000 fires every year and they often turn deadly, causing on average more than 500 deaths, 5,270 fire-related injuries and a staggering $1.1 billion in property damage annually. Continue Reading

What Are the Top Causes of Fires in Apartment Buildings?

Any building is at risk for fires, though causes vary with the structure and how it’s used. Even among residential fires, the risks can be very different, depending on whether it’s a single-family residence or a multifamily dwelling such as an apartment complex, condominium, townhouse or row house.

Multifamily residences have a distinct profile when it comes to fires. Because these buildings have shared heating and air conditioning systems that are maintained by professionals hired by building management, they have fewer fires related to heating systems than single-family residences. 

Multifamily residences are less likely to have individual fireplaces, so apartment buildings have a much lower rate of fires related to chimneys, fireplaces and fireplace maintenance. And, because of the stringent building codes that apartment buildings are required to pass, they have fewer fires caused by electrical problems related to construction and maintenance.   Continue Reading

How to Put Out a Stove Fire

Every day, millions of people cook a meal without giving it a second thought. But much like getting behind the wheel of a car, each time they fire up a burner or turn on the oven, they’re putting themselves at risk — even though it’s something they’ve probably done countless times.

Although dangers like overloaded electrical outlets or cigarettes are often considered the usual suspects when it comes to home fires, cooking fires are actually the leading cause of fires and fire injuries in homes and apartments. 

These fires are responsible for nearly half of home fires and accounted for 21% of home fire deaths and 45% of all home fire injuries from 2012 to 2016. Knowing how to put out a stovetop fire is something that every person needs to learn and take seriously, because lives truly depend on it.

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How Does StoveTop FireStop Work?

Kitchen fires account for an average of 172,000 home fires every year. That makes them the No. 1 cause of home fires and breaks down to about 471 kitchen fires every day in the U.S., which are responsible for a reported 530 civilian deaths, 5,270 fire injuries and some $1.1 billion in property damage every year.  

Learning how to implement stovetop fire prevention and getting the right tools to manage a kitchen fire can save not just money and property, it can also save lives.

StoveTop FireStop is designed to suppress kitchen fires without the need for any human intervention. When a home fire begins, it’s common for people to panic and forget what they need to do. With the StoveTop FireStop fire suppression system, they don’t have to do anything except step away from the fire while it is being suppressed.

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